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maximumak777 (DayZ)

What are the best PC Specs for DayZ?

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I'm thinking about getting a new PC or some upgrades for my current PC, and I want to find out what the best specs for DayZ are. I know that i7s are the best for gaming, but will DayZ still lag with horrible graphics on an i7? I (somehow) manage to run DayZ on an Intel Pentium, but I usually get around 20-30 FPS on low pop servers with occaisonal freezes, low graphics settings and FPS drops (especially in cities and busy areas). 

 

Does DayZ run well on an i5 processor? (please answer this, i5s are much cheaper and if DayZ runs well on an i5 then I will save a lot of money by buying one)

 

 

Which processor does DayZ run best on?

 

 

 

What about graphics cards?

 

 

 

 

Any other specs that would improve DayZ's performance? (e.g. clock speed, RAM, storage space)

 

Thank you!

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Find the Intel CPU with the highest single core performance that you can afford. I use this website http://www.cpubenchmark.net/to compare CPUs if the need arises. Buy at least a GTX 750 or AMD equivalent or better, minimum of 2GB of VRAM although if I were building a PC today I'd want at least 3GB on a stronger GPU core just for longevity's sake. Get an SSD for Windows and DayZ if nothing else. 8GB of RAM because that's the minimum for a gaming PC nowadays anyway.

 

And at the end of it all you need to realize that, at the moment, it would still run like shit even if you had a $1000 Intel i7 and SLI 980ti's. Nothing has really been done yet to move past the inherent limitations of the engine on public builds.

Edited by ColdAtrophy

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Best specs for DayZ without budget now and in the near future would probably be one of the new skylake processors; i7 6700k, 16/32Gb ddr4 ram, 980ti/r9 fury x on a decent mobo and ssd. Windows 7, 'nuff said. I'd recommend GIgabyte GT motherboard but it's really just personal preference in the performance level gear. 980 ti is better than r9 but that doesn't mean r9 is anything to scoff at by ANY means. Both cards have advantages but the 980ti is just a monster in all departments.

 

As for the frames, you'll have the best chance of getting smooth gameplay but it will still probably drop significantly in certain situations until it is optimised. Though I've never tested it on such a machine so can't say for sure. I'll let you know in a few weeks hopefully. :)

Edited by Konfucious K

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Building a PC around a game that has had zero optimization is silly, but I did exactly that so I would be a hypocrite not to at least offer my two cents. Throw as much money as you can at the CPU, get a motherboard that can take advantage of it, and work from there. DayZ thrives on CPU muscle, so that's always going to be priority number one. As a side benefit, it will make everything you do on your computer faster -- if you want to look at it that way.

 

On the graphics side, I went from a GTX 750 Ti to a GTX 970 with all of the rest of my hardware remaining the same; going from 1080p to 1440p at the same time as switching the card, I noticed almost no difference in performance (maybe a few extra frames here or there). So that being said, something of that caliber (a 750 Ti) would be sufficient for single-screen 1080p DayZ. If you're playing at higher resolutions and/or multiple displays, you'll want something stronger.

 

Everything else follows the general advice anyone would give for PC gaming in 2015: go for at least 8 GB RAM, install the most important stuff on an SSD, etc. If you're using an old display, you'd be surprised how much of a difference that can make, too. My new monitor has far better colors than my old one, for example.

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I'm thinking about getting a new PC or some upgrades for my current PC, and I want to find out what the best specs for DayZ are. I know that i7s are the best for gaming, but will DayZ still lag with horrible graphics on an i7? I (somehow) manage to run DayZ on an Intel Pentium, but I usually get around 20-30 FPS on low pop servers with occaisonal freezes, low graphics settings and FPS drops (especially in cities and busy areas). 

 

Does DayZ run well on an i5 processor? (please answer this, i5s are much cheaper and if DayZ runs well on an i5 then I will save a lot of money by buying one)

 

 

Which processor does DayZ run best on?

 

 

 

What about graphics cards?

 

 

 

 

Any other specs that would improve DayZ's performance? (e.g. clock speed, RAM, storage space)

 

Thank you!

CPU: 

 

Intel core i5 or better, 4xxx series or better. For DayZ the AMD FX series is not a great option, while the average frame-rates are quite competitive you will most likely experience frequent and noticeable frame drops (this from a guy who has run both Intel and AMD to play DayZ on many different platforms). Other games like BF4 or anything heavily multi-threaded will love an FX chip (

) but DayZ at the moment relies heavily on single core performance. Developers have stated their work with the renderer is intended to allow multi-scheduling, but that day is not today and on this day Intel smokes AMD in per core performance. 

 

Graphics Card:

 

Nvidia: 660 series or better, so think 660660ti680750ti760, 770. 780. 950960970, 980 Get the best deal you can within this range. A GTX 780 or 970 being optimal. (But if you have the cash, grab a 980ti, nothing can touch it).

 

Radeon: I would look at the R9 290, 290x390 and 390x. These cards smoke GTX 780's at half the price, the later "300" series trucking 8gb of ram for 4k gaming.

 

Sli:

 

This feature is overrated, even today it is wrought with bugs and micro-stuttering and games like DayZ don't really support it, you are better off to get the best single card you can afford.

 

Color coded by performance Goodbetter, best, Super Mega Ultra

 

 

Hard Drives:

 

250gb or greater SSD. Look up the read/writes as they vary greatly. Again, the best deal you can find with the fastest read/writes you can find. Use a large mechanical drive to store your movies and/or music along with any programs or files that slow read/write speeds will go unnoticed. 

 

Motherboards and Memory:

 

The most important part of any motherboard is the chip-set ensure you grab a mid-range (I personally would never) to enthusiast chip-set based board. Otherwise no matter how great and powerful your other components are you will be forced to bottleneck them through substandard system buses, most modern boards will support at least 16GB of ram with is plenty for a gaming enthusiast. Unsure you configure it to run dual channel (think two sticks of the same size and speed). So if you want to start with 8gb and plan of upgrading again soon, then get one 8gb stick and buy a second 8gb later. But if you have decided to stick with 8gb get two 4gb sticks. Be wary, however, a lot of high end boards can be quite expensive, packaged with various bells and whistles seldom used by the average (even enthusiast user) look for a high end chip set paired with a modest (yet complete) set of features. You will pay out the nose for fancy colored PCB's and weird bios interfaces that do very little to enhance performance and stay hidden away inside your case. 

 

Power supplies:

 

An often neglected but ultra/uber/super/extra/wicked important. You want (in my opinion) a Gold Certified power supply of 750w or greater (you do not "out of the gate" need this much wattage, but if you add another card or overclock you will be glad to have this extra juice, plus its better to over-power than under-power).

 

Case:  

 

Another thing often neglected where it counts, you want and need good airflow, hard core gaming heats that bugger up and you need an effective way to exhaust that heat. Looks are all well and good, but a good case serves a specific function. 

 

Sound:

 

Unless you are the most extreme of audiophiles what comes on the board will suffice.

 

Optical drives:

 

Suite to your taste.

 

Monitor:

 

Do not order these online before going into an actual store and comparing the image quality, this is what you will be spending 100% of your time looking at and a large portion of it is subjective to your taste, so take you time and choose wisely. You do not have to buy from there, but you do need to see which monitor looks best to you.

 

Networking:

 

Do everything in your power to hard-line your connection, LAN connections are full duplex which means it can transmit and receive data at the same time, WI-FI can only do one or the other at any given moment and in BIS games with so much information packeted this will reduce lag and give you a far more responsive experience. 

 

Keyboard and mouse:

 

These again vary greatly by taste, but the important things to pay attention to are(in the case of mice), how they feel in your hand, do they have enough buttons for the game you wish to play and dpi. Keyboards, should be mechanical and have n-key rollover i like back lit keys but i don't think its a make or break feature. 

 

 

Extras:

 

I am a huge fan of liquid coolers, even low budget ones that parallel air cooled solutions in their ability to dissipate heat. Liquid coolers run extremely quiet, and free up space inside your case for airflow. One can also liquid cool your GPU It all depends on how deep down the rabbit hole you wish to go. 

 

Ram has been proven time and time again in modern times to be

 in relation to gaming performance (think ddr3 1333 vs 1600 vs 1866 etc etc). Provided you run them dual channel (or quad channel depending on how fancy a board and chip-set you have) there will be a difference of performance equal to the margin of error.  Edited by B@ker

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Wait till full release and ask the question or just buy the parts / computer you can best afford within your budget.

I'm running a i5 2500k oc'd to 4.2 + GTX660, runs pretty well, all things considered.

 

Look stickies...

Moved.

 

 

YUP

 

I did upgrade my graphics card and buy an SSD to squeeze a little more out of my current aged rig but I am holding off to wait and see what hardware ends up being the most robust and best performing through Beta.

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I am holding off to wait and see what hardware ends up being the most robust and best performing through Beta.

I needed a new PC even before I built mine ~9 months ago, but at the time I told myself it didn't matter if I spent money now because better components will just be all the more capable when the game is finally optimized. I don't think we'll see AMD hardware become "better" at running the game than Intel for example, so investing in an Intel CPU now isn't exactly going to shoot you in the foot later -- it'll still be an awesome CPU, and in the mean time it will perform best in the game's unoptimized state.

Edited by Tatanko

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Wait till full release and ask the question or just buy the parts / computer you can best afford within your budget.

I'm running a i5 2500k oc'd to 4.2 + GTX660, runs pretty well, all things considered.

 

Look stickies...

Moved.

This still great gear man, that sandy bridge i7 benchmarks (gamingwise anyways) fairly similar to the new skylake chips. And that GTX 660 is the chip they use in the gtx870m. 

Edited by B@ker

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Recently ditched my AMD FX-8150 3.6Ghz and upgraded to  i7 skylake 6700- doubled my framerates- FPS high 60's in the sticks and 30's in the city. Still using the same GTX 550ti. I haven't done any overclocking or optimization yet. 

 

Just ordered the 980ti today. should be here by the weekend. I figure I'll be able to run this rig for the next few years. Looking forward to FO4!

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