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barnabus

Name the Exoplanets

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Somethings you just need to be able to say you did.  IAU would like you to vote for the suggested names of the exoplanets that have been discovered so far.

 

http://nameexoworlds.iau.org/

Edited by Barnabus

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For a startrek G-type planet you're looking for classic stuff like orbital stability, water, gravity, metals, rotation, surface temperature range - a place folk can more or less live with more or less current technology.

Our solar system is 4.6 billion years old and is "coming to the end of supporting life".  It took 4.5 billion [ 4,600,000,000 ] for humanity to appear on Earth, and conditions for some kind of life will continue for around 1 to 2.3 billion years (but the sun's heat output increases 1% every million years, so 'pretty soon' earth will be more cooked than venus - way before the sun leaves the main sequence in 5 billion, ... use your calculator, work it out).

So the moral is: it takes a long time for life to get going, and then it doesn't have much time left to do anything (our little main sequence sun is a "long lasting" place compared to other locations, so we're lucky). Leave aside us fucking the planet ourselves.

If you want to join the SETI search for alien intelligence, get the distributed computing application (BONIC) from  HERE
Hey dude or dudess, it's free, volunteer and no hassle - it could be YOU the first to get the message. For an explanation of how this works, see THIS EXPLANATION

OR For a whole list of other amazing distributed computing projects you can help with, check out
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_distributed_computing_projects

 

This galaxy contains between 200 and 400 billion stars and at least 100 billion planets (so far we've spotted around 2000 planets, total, mainly BFPs)

So:

I took a check on the planets in this list - Wikipedia -  and I notice they have put up a really crap list of total low grade candidates. I don't know why. There are hundreds of more interesting possibilities that no one is asking the public to name (keeping them for themselves?). These listed planets are non starters.

Here are the first 6 :

Ain (epsilon Tauri) - 'ain' = Arabic for "eye" - now evolved off the main sequence into the giant phase. It is regarded as a red clump that burns helium at its core - massive planet in an eccentric orbit, minimum mass of around 7.6 Jupiter masses (2417 times earth mass - it's not a G-type planet, Captain) but this is the first planet ever discovered in an open cluster. Research in the last few years has moved on from solar-type dwarfs (we're a yellow dwarf, ok?) to various other types of stars, such as evolved (sub)giants. Planets around these have begun to show a further diversity in their properties, which are not necessarily the same as those of planets around 'solar-type' stars (2006). Who knows what might be going on? but none of us apes are ever going to live there (hey 2400x surface gravity aint too bad, maybe? We don't have anything like that around here, for sure).

Edasich (iota Draconis) - an evolved star that has exhausted the supply of core hydrogen and left the main sequence of stars which includes the Sun. With an expanded outer envelope, this giant star is radiating over 55 times the luminosity of the Sun at an effective temperature of 4,545 K. - the planet is way-far too close for the goldilocks zone, it's a total very-very big dead hot rock, dudes - 'Edasich' European name comes from the Arabic Al Ḍhiba', or Al dhīlī meaning 'Male hyena'. Or in Chinese = Zǐ Wēi Zuǒ Yuán yī, meaning "the First Star of Left Wall of the Purple Forbidden Enclosure." Sounds kinda Klingon dont it?
Call it HYENA definitely.

Errai (gamma Cephei)- will be our new Pole Star around 4000 CE (because of precession) - it's really binary if you look close - the big one is a subgiant star just leaving the main sequence, about 6.6 billion years old . - the planet is 1.6x Jupiter mass (500 earth gravs) AND has a red dwarf also in orbit around the main star with it, further out. So that's kind of sticky (because they overtake each other from time to time, right? I don't know how often that happens but it has got to be hairy). And ... guess? Errai's Chinese name is "Zǐ Wēi Zuǒ Yuán qī" meaning "the Seventh Star of Left Wall of Purple Forbidden Enclosure." and this name also suggests in Chinese "The Second Imperial Guard." so it's definitely Klingons out that way (keep watching the Galactic North).

Fomalhaut (alpha Piscis Austrini) - very good for infrared radiation - ( hey - monitoring for infrared excess emission from stellar systems is one method to enable a search for large-scale stellar engineering projects of an extraterrestrial civilization; for example a Dyson sphere - but boffins agree the rad is from Fomalhaut's natural young-star planet-forming dust and debris disks) - the planet they are talking about (I think, planet 'Fomalhaut b') is shrouded by debris, so it may be a big gravitationally-bound accumulation of rubble not a whole planet, with a mass somewhere from 17 to 1000 times Earth (hard to tell in that mess) - the debris belt it orbits inside takes around 2000 kilometre-sized comet collisions per earth day, to make the day interesting.
Two other planets have been suggested by observations of the outer dust ring, they are indicated to be 6000 to 9500 times Earth Mass ( they are BFPs )

Pollux (beta Geminorum)
epsilon Eridani - only a billion years old, so no local bacteria yet even if it's a nice place - maybe it's not, maybe there is no planet at all, but "many astronomers now agree the planet is confirmed" and has maybe x380 Earth mass (OK, so at 380 earth gravs and a long way from the sun, who's looking for carbon-water lifeforms anyways? ... just name it and move on). Pollux definitely has 2 asteroid belts and a disk of debris. It has been the target of SETI searches because its so close, but so far only got the answerphone.

mu Arae - main sequence G-type star - Has Four Known Planets - planet 'Mu Arae c' (2004) seems to be a "super earth"(means it has not more than fifteen times earth mass) with a 9 day orbit, extremely hot bare rock ball. The others are Jupiter-style. The star is low on UV so it's suggested there is no way biomolecules could form. If the inner gas giant 'Mu Arae d' had moons they would get sufficient UV but they would be bald hot, waterless, no atmosphere, etc... So take your choice. I'd go for a gas-giant moon myself (if there are any) but no one is asking me to name one.

tau Boötis - binary star - and the planet is another BMP (around 1900 times Earth mass) orbiting Tau Boötis only half as far away as our Earth orbit, and the star is 20% bigger, brighter and hotter. So figure it.

upsilon Andromedae - young F-type main-sequence star with binary. As of 2010, four confirmed planets are known to orbit the primary star. All likely to be Jupiter-size planets ( maybe 300x Earth mass). Nobody saying anything about gas-giant moons here because nobody knows. And a Jupiter-size planet is too small to have a half-way decent moon aint it ? But 'upsilon Andromedae d' is in the system's habitable zone, in case you like gas-giants (EVE pilots might want to know this).

.. guess that's bout enough ..

except

42 Draconis - 5th magnitude K-type giant star - "There is a suggestion that K Spectrum stars may potentially increase the chances of life developing on orbiting planets that are within the habitable zone"

 

Bet that was boring ?

Anyone else want to make a note on the rest of the planet list ?

There is at least one planet on average per star. About 1 in 5 Sun-like stars have an "Earth-sized"planet in the habitable zone

Solar Twin =  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_analog

Goldilocks zone = https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Circumstellar_habitable_zone

 

Habitability

Possibility of complex and intelligent life

 

xx pilgrim

 

(edit - sorry dudes, I forgot.. I guess you all know what a BFP is, right ?)
 

Edited by pilgrim

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For a startrek G-type planet you're looking for classic stuff like orbital stability, water, gravity, metals, rotation, surface temperature range - a place folk can more or less live with more or less current technology.

Our solar system is 4.6 billion years old and is "coming to the end of supporting life".  It took 4.5 billion [ 4,600,000,000 ] for humanity to appear on Earth, and conditions for some kind of life will continue for around 1 to 2.3 billion years (but the sun's heat output increases 1% every million years, so 'pretty soon' earth will be more cooked than venus - way before the sun leaves the main sequence in 5 billion, ... use your calculator, work it out).

So the moral is: it takes a long time for life to get going, and then it doesn't have much time left to do anything (our little main sequence sun is a "long lasting" place compared to other locations, so we're lucky). Leave aside us fucking the planet ourselves.

If you want to join the SETI search for alien intelligence, get the distributed computing application (BONIC) from  HERE

Hey dude or dudess, it's free, volunteer and no hassle - it could be YOU the first to get the message. For an explanation of how this works, see THIS EXPLANATION

OR For a whole list of other amazing distributed computing projects you can help with, check out

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_distributed_computing_projects

 

This galaxy contains between 200 and 400 billion stars and at least 100 billion planets (so far we've spotted around 2000 planets, total, mainly BFPs)

So:

I took a check on the planets in this list - Wikipedia -  and I notice they have put up a really crap list of total low grade candidates. I don't know why. There are hundreds of more interesting possibilities that no one is asking the public to name (keeping them for themselves?). These listed planets are non starters.

Here are the first 6 :

Ain (epsilon Tauri) - 'ain' = Arabic for "eye" - now evolved off the main sequence into the giant phase. It is regarded as a red clump that burns helium at its core - massive planet in an eccentric orbit, minimum mass of around 7.6 Jupiter masses (2417 times earth mass - it's not a G-type planet, Captain) but this is the first planet ever discovered in an open cluster. Research in the last few years has moved on from solar-type dwarfs (we're a yellow dwarf, ok?) to various other types of stars, such as evolved (sub)giants. Planets around these have begun to show a further diversity in their properties, which are not necessarily the same as those of planets around 'solar-type' stars (2006). Who knows what might be going on? but none of us apes are ever going to live there (hey 2400x surface gravity aint too bad, maybe? We don't have anything like that around here, for sure).

Edasich (iota Draconis) - an evolved star that has exhausted the supply of core hydrogen and left the main sequence of stars which includes the Sun. With an expanded outer envelope, this giant star is radiating over 55 times the luminosity of the Sun at an effective temperature of 4,545 K. - the planet is way-far too close for the goldilocks zone, it's a total very-very big dead hot rock, dudes - 'Edasich' European name comes from the Arabic Al Ḍhiba', or Al dhīlī meaning 'Male hyena'. Or in Chinese = Zǐ Wēi Zuǒ Yuán yī, meaning "the First Star of Left Wall of the Purple Forbidden Enclosure." Sounds kinda Klingon dont it?

Call it HYENA definitely.

Errai (gamma Cephei)- will be our new Pole Star around 4000 CE (because of precession) - it's really binary if you look close - the big one is a subgiant star just leaving the main sequence, about 6.6 billion years old . - the planet is 1.6x Jupiter mass (500 earth gravs) AND has a red dwarf also in orbit around the main star with it, further out. So that's kind of sticky (because they overtake each other from time to time, right? I don't know how often that happens but it has got to be hairy). And ... guess? Errai's Chinese name is "Zǐ Wēi Zuǒ Yuán qī" meaning "the Seventh Star of Left Wall of Purple Forbidden Enclosure." and this name also suggests in Chinese "The Second Imperial Guard." so it's definitely Klingons out that way (keep watching the Galactic North).

Fomalhaut (alpha Piscis Austrini) - very good for infrared radiation - ( hey - monitoring for infrared excess emission from stellar systems is one method to enable a search for large-scale stellar engineering projects of an extraterrestrial civilization; for example a Dyson sphere - but boffins agree the rad is from Fomalhaut's natural young-star planet-forming dust and debris disks) - the planet they are talking about (I think, planet 'Fomalhaut b') is shrouded by debris, so it may be a big gravitationally-bound accumulation of rubble not a whole planet, with a mass somewhere from 17 to 1000 times Earth (hard to tell in that mess) - the debris belt it orbits inside takes around 2000 kilometre-sized comet collisions per earth day, to make the day interesting.

Two other planets have been suggested by observations of the outer dust ring, they are indicated to be 6000 to 9500 times Earth Mass ( they are BFPs )

Pollux (beta Geminorum)

epsilon Eridani - only a billion years old, so no local bacteria yet even if it's a nice place - maybe it's not, maybe there is no planet at all, but "many astronomers now agree the planet is confirmed" and has maybe x380 Earth mass (OK, so at 380 earth gravs and a long way from the sun, who's looking for carbon-water lifeforms anyways? ... just name it and move on). Pollux definitely has 2 asteroid belts and a disk of debris. It has been the target of SETI searches because its so close, but so far only got the answerphone.

mu Arae - main sequence G-type star - Has Four Known Planets - planet 'Mu Arae c' (2004) seems to be a "super earth"(means it has not more than fifteen times earth mass) with a 9 day orbit, extremely hot bare rock ball. The others are Jupiter-style. The star is low on UV so it's suggested there is no way biomolecules could form. If the inner gas giant 'Mu Arae d' had moons they would get sufficient UV but they would be bald hot, waterless, no atmosphere, etc... So take your choice. I'd go for a gas-giant moon myself (if there are any) but no one is asking me to name one.

tau Boötis - binary star - and the planet is another BMP (around 1900 times Earth mass) orbiting Tau Boötis only half as far away as our Earth orbit, and the star is 20% bigger, brighter and hotter. So figure it.

upsilon Andromedae - young F-type main-sequence star with binary. As of 2010, four confirmed planets are known to orbit the primary star. All likely to be Jupiter-size planets ( maybe 300x Earth mass). Nobody saying anything about gas-giant moons here because nobody knows. And a Jupiter-size planet is too small to have a half-way decent moon aint it ? But 'upsilon Andromedae d' is in the system's habitable zone, in case you like gas-giants (EVE pilots might want to know this).

.. guess that's bout enough ..

except

42 Draconis - 5th magnitude K-type giant star - "There is a suggestion that K Spectrum stars may potentially increase the chances of life developing on orbiting planets that are within the habitable zone"

 

Bet that was boring ?

Anyone else want to make a note on the rest of the planet list ?

There is at least one planet on average per star. About 1 in 5 Sun-like stars have an "Earth-sized"planet in the habitable zone

Solar Twin =  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_analog

Goldilocks zone = https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Circumstellar_habitable_zone

 

Habitability

Possibility of complex and intelligent life

 

xx pilgrim

 

(edit - sorry dudes, I forgot.. I guess you all know what a BFP is, right ?)

 

I would imagine that many of the gas giants we can see have many additional moons we cannot see.  I also imagine that these names we are voting for are provisional at best.  If anyone actually ever gets to them the names will become more appropriate.  Right now, this is just a lark and a fun thing to do.

 

BTW, do not fear climate change, embrace it, as an Anthropologist I can tell you that climate change is the kick in the genetic balls that is required to produce adaptations.  Climate change is essential to evolution.  Evolution is not done with us until we become extinct and if we are another of many, many failed experiments, then so let it written, so let it be done.

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..//..  Evolution is not done with us until we become extinct and if we are another of many, many failed experiments, then so let it be written, so let it be done.

 

Hai! - The DayZ Endgame Theory again ... so if we DONT fail, then what's the endgame for Humanity ?

 

We spend a lot more now on earth-based big science because we've got the spare money from giving up physical space exploration

But really I was just hoping to get a couple of folk to click one one or two interesting links, that's all .. no harm intended ..

 

I asked the Krill before I did it - they said it was OK go right ahead

 

The krill know everything

 

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Hai! - The DayZ Endgame Theory again ... so if we DONT fail, then what's the endgame for Humanity ?

 

We spend a lot more now on earth-based big science because we've got the spare money from giving up physical space exploration

But really I was just hoping to get a couple of folk to click one one or two interesting links, that's all .. no harm intended ..

 

I asked the Krill before I did it - they said it was OK go right ahead

 

The krill know everything

 

LOL, The end game is simple, adapt or die.  I think we'll adapt and all the chicken littles will be proved wrong.  Didn't the Krell tell you that?  Besides, what would they know anyway?, They killed themselves with their own Id.

Edited by Barnabus

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LOL, The end game is simple, adapt or die.  I think we'll adapt and all the chicken littles will be proved wrong.  Didn't the Krell tell you that?  Besides, what would they know anyway?, They killed themselves with their own Id.

The Krill are doing OK on this planet

The Grass is doing OK on this planet

what else is doing ok ?

 

just one regional species of krill in the southern (Antarctic) ocean, Euphausia superba, has a biomass of around 379,000,000 tonnes which is greater than the total biomass of humanity - not considering the rest of the KRILL of all the world's oceans. The Krill are this planet's single most important macro life form (along with grass as a distant second, natch.. )

 

Across a large part of this galactic quadrant, it's an accepted fact that Earth belongs to the Krill. On the other hand a recent poll shows most sentient species have never heard of "humans"

 

A peta-zillion mega-swarms of tiny crustaceans can't be wrong. (we're talking up to 60,000 KRILL per cubic metre, here) ...

I guess you just scared to ask them ?

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The Krill are doing OK on this planet

The Grass is doing OK on this planet

what else is doing ok ?

 

just one regional species of krill in the southern (Antarctic) ocean, Euphausia superba, has a biomass of around 379,000,000 tonnes which is greater than the total biomass of humanity - not considering the rest of the KRILL of all the world's oceans. The Krill are this planet's single most important macro life form (along with grass as a distant second, natch.. )

 

Across a large part of this galactic quadrant, it's an accepted fact that Earth belongs to the Krill. On the other hand a recent poll shows most sentient species have never heard of "humans"

 

A peta-zillion mega-swarms of tiny crustaceans can't be wrong. (we're talking up to 60,000 KRILL per cubic metre, here) ...

I guess you just scared to ask them ?

I thought you meant "the Krell".  My bad.  https://forbiddenplanet.com/

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